Super Blue Moon Eclipse: January 2018 Lunar Eclipse

The lunar eclipse this coming end of January will be the first of its kind since 150 years ago. It is because it will be a Blue Moon Lunar Eclipse. The earth will overshadow the second of the full moon in January’s calendar month. It will commence on the night hours during the 31st of January 2018.

source: naatlanta.com

Lunar Eclipse Map

Western Continent: The occasion will take place during the day in Pacific regions and western parts of North America. A partial eclipse is viewable for people living on the East Coast, due to the moon setting down before the lunar eclipse completion. Those from the west beyond North Dakota, El Paso, and Texas will be able to see the full stages of the event with the moon setting down after. Los Angeles audiences will enjoy the view during daybreak. Alaska, Hawaii, and Yukon will get to appreciate the full stages in a night sky. Northwest regions, British Columbia and some areas of Nunavut will also have the same setting.

Asia: Total lunar eclipse will start on the night of January 31st in East Asia and the Pacific. Australia, China, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, New Zealand and the Philippines can see the whole episode as long as the weather permits.

Time Table:

Total lunar eclipse is estimated to last as long as 1 hour and 15 minutes. Expect for a partial umbral eclipse for an hour before and after the totality. On the other hand, the Penumbral eclipse is not visible in some areas.

source: theweathernetwork.com

These timetables are all written in the North American time zone for the date of January 31, 2018:

  • Eastern Standard Time: Partial umbral eclipse commences at 6:48 a.m. EST

 

  • Central Standard Time: Partial umbral eclipse commences at 5:48 a.m. CST while the total eclipse starts at 6:52 a.m. CDT and the moon may set before totality finishes

 

  • Mountain Standard Time: Partial umbral eclipse commences at 4:48 a.m. MST while the total eclipse starts at 5:52 a.m. MST. The greatest eclipse is viewable at 6:30 a.m. MST and the total eclipse ends at 7:08 a.m. MST.

 

  • Pacific Standard Time: Partial umbral eclipse commences at 3:48 a.m. PST while the total eclipse starts at 4:52 a.m. PST. Greatest eclipse is viewable at 5:30 a.m. PST and the total eclipse ends at 6:08 a.m. PST. Lastly, the partial umbral eclipse finishes at 7:11 a.m. PST.
  • Alaskan Standard Time: Partial umbral eclipse commences at 2:48 a.m. AKST while the total eclipse starts at 3:52 a.m. AKST. Greatest eclipse is viewable at 4:30 a.m. AKST and the total eclipse ends at 5:08 a.m. AKST. Lastly, partial umbral eclipse finishes at 6:11 a.m. AKST.

 

  • Hawaii-Aleutian Standard Time: Partial umbral eclipse commences at 1:48 a.m. HAST while the total eclipse begins: 2:52 a.m. HAST. Greatest eclipse is viewable at 3:30 a.m. HAST and the total eclipse ends at 4:08 a.m. HAST. Lastly, partial umbral eclipse finishes at 5:11 a.m. HAST.

 

The Super Blue Moon eclipse is a once in a lifetime event, and it would be a shame to miss it. Set your calendars and be sure to enjoy this natural phenomenon.